Black Writers Have No Support Groups Like White Writers

To My Fellow Black Wordsmiths,

I took this audio from one of my writing meetings I host here in Tarrant Country, TX called Wordsmiths & Readers of Tarrant (WRT), a group I started so local writers and artists in the area could have a place to actually discuss and explore the craft of the language arts.

The splendid young lady I'm speaking to goes by the pen name Nai Williams (
http://tiny.cc/fxavtz).

Our meeting dialogue gravitated towards the issue, being that we're both black writers, of how black novelists and poets don't have the same types of support networks and peer groups white writers have, which makes it extremely difficult for us to stay motivated as artists.

In this edition of Poethnic Justice, where I like to cover how literary art is an effective tool in fighting white supremacy, we discuss some solutions to this dilemma that all black writers face.

Please feel free to join the discussion.

One Love & One Justice,
The Stormy Poet

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p: (817) 382-1108‬
e: tsp@thestormypoet.com


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10 thoughts on “Black Writers Have No Support Groups Like White Writers

    1. ShiraDest,

      No, it definitely is not your imagination in the least. I can’t tell how many black writers gave up on their craft simply for the fact is so hard to keep the damn morale up when you’re going through the tedious effort of composing a book and building a platform. Plus, as is the case with most arenas in society, white writers have a network of people backing them.

      They have a whole slew of supportive individuals–aside from the general public–like graphic designers, support groups, editors, and published authors who can lace them with the game about all the ends and outs of the writing and publishing process.

      On top of that, most of the famous writers we know about don’t look like us, and the ones that do aren’t generally held in the same prestigious regard, such as Ida B. Wells, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, or even Maya Angelou (the only time she really gets shine is during Black History Month). It’s definitely not just your imagination, and you’re definitely not alone. Rel talk.

      Thing is, a couple of individuals and I are forumlating something to counteract that dynamic. I want black writers to have that same kind of support network. There are too many talented individuals who never got to contribute to changing the world with their literature because of this systematic racism bull. As a writer, I feel it’s my duty to uphold the craft in black society.

      If society at large won’t hold us in the high esteem we deserve, then, black society will. Literature is a more powerful artform than we give it credit for, and thank literature is a crucial tool in the fight against this system. And, outside of that mission, we should be able to freely share and enjoy our work with the world and with one another. There’s so much beauty out there we’ll never get to read, and that’s sad.

      Thank you so much for your comment. Do so any time. Sorry for the essay, but, as you can tell, I’m passionate lol.

      From the Soul,
      T.S.P.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No need to apologize at all, it helped me understand my aloneness. I have been reminding myself of Octavia Butlers experience for the past two years, now, as I worked on my WiPs, and have resigned myself to my newly published manual going into obscurity, but not quietly, if I can help it.
        Thank you for your conscientious response to duty, my brother in arms.

        How can I help?
        Destinie

        Liked by 1 person

      2. ShiraDest,

        I’m humbled by the kind words sister, and I hope what I said was able to give you some semblance of comradery. And very few people know about Octavia Butler. Very nice reference. Word.

        You’re more than welcome, my sister in arms. And the best way you can help is by just by unapologetically being yourself as a writer and being a master of your craft and inspiring others to master their craft. We need more black writers like you.

        Once we get together about what we got going on, I will reach out to you.

        Happy Writing,
        T.S.P.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you, T.

        Looking fwd to getting back to *my* writing once I find someone to take up the baton for Project Do Better. Please let me know if you’d like a link, here.

        Peace, my Brother;
        Destinie

        Liked by 1 person

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